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New Kawasaki Ninja 250 rendering looks spot on

With Japanese compatriots Honda, Suzuki and Yamaha updating their 250 cc segment, Kawasaki is all set to announce a new update.

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All new Kawasaki Ninja 250 has been spotted on test multiple times earlier this year. To be launched this year, details of the bike are not yet disclosed. Thanks to the spy images and leaked sketches, Japan’s Young Machine magazine has managed to create a fantastic render of the new quarter liter.

New Kawasaki Ninja 250 design has been inspired by the larger Ninja 650, which was launched in India a few weeks back. The render shows that the new Ninja 250 comes with a larger fuel tank with a sleeker headlamp and fairing design. Mirrors bore sharp lines while front visor is also evident.

The current Kawasaki Ninja 250 has been on sale since 2013 without any update. The new Ninja will not only be lighter, but it will also be more responsive and sharper in handling. Highlights include new instrument console, disc brakes with dual channel ABS, twin projector headlamp with LED DRL and LED taillights, upside down forks in the front, etc.

Details where engine specifications are concerned, they are still under wraps. But one thing is for sure, it will not be a four cylinder mill (as previously rumored), instead it will be a twin cylinder. This will help Kawasaki rival the likes of new Honda CBR250RR, Yamaha R25 and the new Suzuki GSX-R250 aggressively on the price front, especially when you know that both of them are twin cylinder machines.

The twin cylinder from Kawasaki will deliver 32 PS at 11,000 rpm and 21 Nm at 10,000 rpm. Speaking about 4 cylinder 250 cc engines – Kawasaki Ninja 250cc with a four cylinder variant was on sale during the period 1988 to 2004. The bike competed with Honda CBR250RR while it was a leader once the production of Honda CBR 250RR was pulled out of production in 1996 and when Yahama FZR 250 and Suzuki GSX-R250 also ended production in 1994. Due to stricter emission norms and increase in competition most manufacturers have moved to a twin cylinder today.