German automakers multiplier proposal for high-emission vehicles against zero-emission vehicles built, 2020 EU legislation

In July 2012, the European Commission had published a proposal to review Regulation 443/2009 which sets targets for CO2 emission where new passenger cars are concerned. This proposal also took into account sales of ‘ultra low carbon vehicles’ (ULCV) through supercredits.

Mercedes-Benz CLA 250 Edition 1, (C117), 2012

The German Government has approached the Commission for reformation of supercredits proposals though there seems to be little desire to bring such concessions into effect where future emission standards are concerned. Though supercredits are offered as an incentive to auto manufacturers to supply more ULCVs, the German Government has not received any support for this concept which has therefore resulted in a new proposal called a ‘multiplier’.

This is aimed at rewarding the German auto makers to permit them to manufacture high emission vehicles in a certain proportion to the amount of zero emission vehicles produced. By this coming into effect, the result will be a lower impact of European Commission’s proposed 2020 legislation.

443/2009 proposal has set car CO2 regulations at 130 g/km for fleet average of all new cars in 2015 and an additional target of 95 g/km in 2020. The guidelines set in 2012, require an average of 65% of auto manufacturer’s newly registered cars to comply to the limitation at start. This number rises to 75% in 2013, 80% in 2014, and 100% from 2015 onward. The targets are to followed by one and all across car segments, which is a daunting challenge for luxury automakers Mercedes-Benz, BMW and Audi which have powerful cars making it more difficult to adhere to the set guidelines.